Shocking Need in Iraq For Special Needs Diapers Even For Young People

Why so many? Why is there such a horrific need for adult special needs diapers in Iraq?

One of the reasons for the need is physical injuries suffered during 18 years of continuous war in Iraq.

I have previously I told the story of Intesar (38), a paralyzed mother of two who receives adult diapers from our Diapers for Refugees program. She was paralyzed when hit by crossfire between American troops and Islamic State terrorists.

But cases like hers do not explain the large number of young people born with neurological disorders and other issues the last 10 to 15 years that cause them to need diapers the rest of their lives.

I am beginning to understand the cause and it is not going to go away.

Many of those born with neurological problems have high levels of uranium and thorium in their bodies. Some close to American bases have radiation levels in their teeth 28 times greater than normal. A lot of the ammunition we used in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan was made out of depleted uranium.

“Depleted” sounds safe, but there is no such thing as uranium that is not radioactive. Even the raw ore coming from the ground is radioactive.

But there is a bigger issue. Chemically, uranium causes the same problems that lead does.

Uranium mines are not safe and mining companies take steps to protect workers. Safeguards are mandated by the Federal government. The state of Virginia has the largest reserves of uranium in the nation and will not allow mining because of the dangers.

A mining association report says that uranium ore “…has chemical toxicity similar to lead, so occupational hygiene precautions are taken similar to those in a lead smelter.”

In other words, the uranium can cause the same neurological damage as lead even if it was not radioactive, which it is. Yes, it is a small amount of radiation. The problem is the length of exposure. Children near American bases and in areas where there was heavy combat are showing the signs of neurological damage.

I am not judging the kind of ammunition our military forces use in Iraq or elsewhere. I am no expert on what is effective. All I know is that we need a lot more diapers for special needs children.

In the middle of preparations for the Christmas for Refugees program I can’t work on the special needs’ diapers program … but I promise you I will beginning in January. This problem is not going to go away.

There are many elderly who did not receive proper medical care during the last two decades who now require diapers. There are many middle-age and young who were injured in bombings and shot by the Islamic State. Then there are the younger ones that break my heart because they will never have normal lives.

The suffering of these younger Iraqi Christians is not abstract for me. My wife Nancy and I have been in their homes. We have prayed with them and we have promised them help. I intend, with the help of the Lord, to keep my promise to them.

The Need for Diapers for Refugees

The Diapers for Refugees program we operate in the Nineveh Plain is an essential program that no other organization offers. We are also the only organization furnishing sanitary napkins to women in that area.

The adult diapers, not only for the elderly but for younger people with special needs, can literally change lives. I have mentioned before about being in the homes of some in need of adult diapers, talking and praying with them.

Iraq has literally been in a state of war since 2003. By the official end of the war in 2011, 4,497 American service personnel had died and 26,050 were wounded. Estimates are that more than 600,000 Iraqi civilians have died — and that does not include those murdered by the Islamic State (ISIS). The Christian population of Iraq has been reduced by 83%.

The destruction of hospitals by all sides and the number of doctors who have fled, has caused a drastic rise in the number of children born with severe disabilities. I have visited with some of these children and their families, and prayed for many of them.

Now there is a new crisis on the Nineveh Plain, as Syrian families with elderly parents or special needs children cross over into this area of Iraq. As of now we are reaching only a small percentage of the Syrian Christian refugees who need help.

To expand the diaper program to the Syrian refugees in the Nineveh Plain would cost an additional $5,000 a month. We cannot make that commitment now.            

For now, we must get through 2019. Please pray this month for the success of the diaper program this year.

Program Update

Diapers often increase the overall quality of life for elderly and special needs Christian refugees.

Special needs adult diapers: I received the first request for adult diapers in 2018. Our team had been so centered on the babies and toddlers and their needs that the idea of adult diapers had never been considered.

I did not think there would be a big demand for the adult diapers. I was wrong!

The percentage of older adults with special needs for diapers is far higher than in the United States because of the lack of medical care during war time. Infections that could have been cured caused damage that could never be undone.

Until I talked to some of those receiving the adult diapers, I did not understand how much lives were changed for the better by them. In many cases it is a matter of being able to sleep through the night. There were tears in the eyes of one man who told me how his life was changed by having the diapers. He told me he could sleep on a mattress for the first time in years!

The budget for the adult diapers just keeps growing and we are not even dealing with a large population. We are only supplying the needs of the Christian community on the Nineveh Plain. Our entire operation in Iraq is within 200 square miles. Our ministry partners in Jordan have been asking for assistance with the adult diapers as well. Again, the problems were mostly caused by lack of medical care. In Jordan the medical care was not available because of money. All the Iraqi and Syrian Christians are there illegally as refugees, and are not allowed to work. Most of those have no homes to go back to.

I do not want this ministry in the situation where we are able to do something one time and then never again. Promises should not be made if they that cannot be kept. We have been able to begin a small Diapers for Refugees program in Jordan targeting mostly elderly with special needs. The budget for 2019 is set, but we will try to do more in 2020.

While many Christian refugee families are unable to fully provide for their children, the government and other global organizations do not provide support.

Babies still need diapers: It is just not right to ask a young married couple to not have children because they are refugees through no fault of their own, but that is exactly what the United Nations and USAID expects. The United Nations, USAID and the EU hand out condoms and birth control pills.

If the young families are expected to hold off having children until the society in Iraq and Syria is back to “normal” economically, then they will never have children. It will take Iraq at least 50 years to recover from the 2003 invasion; the uprising against the US occupation and then the war with the Islamic State.

Although it is no longer in the news, there is still fighting going on in Iraq. There are still pockets of the Islamic State (ISIS) and al-Qaeda.

Click here to help provide diapers to Christian Refugees in need!

Rayan: The Stories of Those We Support

Rayan xxxxxxxxxxxxxx (36) is a displaced Christian father of a one-year old daughter named Rebeca. He has been displaced from Bartella with his family since 2014 due to ISIS taking over their home, causing them to flee and take refuge in the city of Erbil. Rayan was one of the first people to return back home because of his love for his own village and his grandparents land. When he returned to see if his house was still livable, he was shocked to see the house totally burned into rubble. When asked about his living situation and his job, he smiled and said, “I work as an electrical employee. Some days I get payments, and some days I do not. Most people don’t have enough funds to rebuild their houses. If relatives and neighbors call me to help them in fixing electrical cables in their houses, I will get money on those days. Otherwise, I am still without money and I sometimes can’t feed my family. The wages don’t exceed $8 per day for 8 hours of working, which covers just a part of living costs for my family. We are dependent on your regular distribution of diapers and it greatly helps us as a family in saving some money to put towards our living situation. Actually, my wife was concerned two days ago because we used our last diaper and we do not have money to buy a new sack, but I told her I trust in our Lord that he will send your team to deliver diapers. I would have had to buy diapers instead of rice if there was any delay. Praise the Lord your team came at the same day. It is very encouraging what the Lord is doing to stand alongside us. Unfortunately, we are feeling like strangers in our home village due to the persecution we had faced by ISIS. Now, most of the citizens in Bartella are from Muslim background and many Christian citizens immigrated to foreign countries”.

Intesar: The Stories of Those We Support

Intesar xxxxxxxxxxxxxx (38), is a paralyzed mother of two and is currently among the many displaced Christians from Qaraqosh, this is her story.

“In 2005 I went to clinic at Mosul to receive a treatment …unfortunately, when I finished my visit and was on the way to my home village (Qaraqosh), I was shot by an unknown gunman during confrontations between US military troops and terrorists. This shot has changed me from being a normal woman to a paralyzed woman.” Intesar stops talking for a while as her eyes fill with tears while she describes the crisis that she was  going through. When asked about her living conditions when ISIS occupied Qaraqosh, she replied “we were forced to flee away from Qaraqosh and were displaced from it  in June 2014, at that time we went to Erbil. Then in August 2014 ISIS started to attack Qaraqosh with mortar fire, some people were killed, and then everyone started to escape from there seeking refuge in Erbil. It was so crowded, tragic to see such view. We left everything behind and went to an unknown future, after waiting for so long in the main checkpoint of Erbil. We finally managed to get in the city, at that time we were sleeping in the streets and gardens. It was so hard for us. Now, we rent  a small house because ISIS burned our entire house after collecting our furniture and putting it in the middle of the house to ensure that the fire would increase rapidly and destroy the house totally. They destroyed all our beautiful memories with it. We don’t have adequate money to rebuild our house. My husband is just a daily worker and we lost all our belongings and savings during the war with ISIS. So many of us are fighting just to live. These helpful diapers are one of my much needed items that will help me survive. Your team is doing an affective role in presenting services that the government cannot or does not provide any support for disabled people with their families. You indicate that you do love me through your visit. God bless you all for your faithful loving service to our Lord”.

Yara: The Stories of Those We Support

Follow along for a series of The Stories of Those We Support to get a new perspective of the Diapers for Refugees Program, first-hand from Christian refugees in the Middle East.

Yara xxxxxxxxxxx (14) has been displaced from the city of Qaraqosh with her family since June 2014 when they had to flee and take refuge in the City of Erbil after ISIS occupied their city. Yara has been paralyzed since birth due to damage of her brain cells as a result of a choking incident that occurred when she was born.  Her parents discovered this disease when she was just two months old. Since then, Yara has undergone various stem cell treatments that were unsuccessful. After asking her father what her daily difficulties are, he replied “Actually , one of her worst challenges that she is struggling with is she is unable to depend on herself to use the bathroom or even walk, so we carry her and it is not easy for us because she is grown up and heavy. Also, she cannot speak to express her feelings. Therefore, sometimes we cannot guess what she is going through or what her real need is. We are especially thankful for your willingness to help, please know that we deeply appreciated that you put in effort to cover our expressed needs and may the lord bless all the people who donated these useful supplies abundantly”.

The Stories of Those We Support

      Diapers for Refugees has been committed to serving the Christian victims of radical Islam since 2016. To understand the influence your support has made through this program, please read this story from an 86-year-old man with paralyzed legs who receives adult diapers from our Diapers for Refugees program.

 

Adult diapers allow this paralyzed man to sleep normally at night.

“I love to state my gratitude for your help, I want to ask you to keep providing this kind of help, because I can’t afford the diapers for myself due to my disability and illness. I am aged patient, but with the diapers I can sleep properly in my home with a proper life.

I am satisfied with what God done for me that He made me be able to return back to my hometown when the Daesh (ISIS) were defeated. I believe that God didn’t forget me.

I love my hometown and my church which my father, the village families, and I helped to build Al-Tahera church that’s why I will never leave it; part of my life. I decided to stay here in Qaraqosh till I die.”

      The man, who we will call Matthew, was helped to escape as the Islamic State overran the Nineveh Plain. He was cared for in a camp for displaced persons in Erbil but insisted on returning to his native town of Qaraqosh.

      Many have returned with him to ancestral homes on the Nineveh Plain including young families who now have babies and toddlers. They are returning to looted and destroyed homes.

      This ministry is blessed to have the opportunity to make a very real impact on Christians who have suffered loss and humiliation.

       You see, the Religious Freedom Coalition provides diapers every month, not just to disabled elderly, but directly to 1,080 babies and toddlers of Christian mothers in the Nineveh Plain area of Iraq.

       This note from the mother of four-month-old Jeenil Waad Moses from Bartilla encourages us to work to do even more.

 

More than 1,000 displaced Christian mothers receive diapers for their babies and toddlers.

“I have been recieved diapers for three times, one time monthly… I was not able to buy diapers for my daughter since the day of her birth.

I was very happy once I saw your team members and I felt that God didn’t forget us even though our house is destroyed and we do not even have a bed to sleep on.

Your team visit means a lot for us and make a huge difference in our lives.”

      By supplying these mothers and babies with diapers, we are strengthening their faith in Christ and proving that they can trust in God to provide for their babies’ needs!

        The joy this program provides for these displaced Christian mothers is evident in their smiles. To show your support to this growing program and to do your part to come alongside our brothers and sisters in need, please help by donating today!

Two Million Diapers in 2019

Two million diapers in 2019:  More help is needed for Christian families on the Biblically important Nineveh Plain — not less.

There is no running water in many of the Christian towns on the Nineveh Plain.

 

Two full years after liberation, areas of Qaraqosh still look like this. Note that the power lines actually are not connected to anything.

Their water came from the dam on the Tigris river near the major Iraqi city of Mosul. That was the largest Iraqi city held by the Islamic State and it took more than a year for the Iraqi Army and Shia militias to take the city back from the Sunni jihadists of the Islamic State even with nearly constant bombing by The United States and other Western air forces.

The electric power plants were destroyed in the bombing. The water treatment plants were destroyed in the bombing. The water pumping stations were destroyed in the bombings. Most of the power lines came down and the water pipelines were hit as well.

When I was in Iraq this past December, there were still craters in roads. While many of the bridges that were bombed by the Western Coalition to stop Islamic State movements have been rebuilt, there are still some bridges that are down making transporting water difficult.

It gets worse: As I have mentioned previously in newsletters the water from wells on the Nineveh Plain is as salty as the sea. The well water is not drinkable. Cloth diapers cannot be washed in well water as the salt will stay in the diapers and irritate babies, causing diaper rash. The whole purpose of our Diapers for Refugees program is to reduce or stop completely the problem of severe diaper rash that can cause bacterial infections.

During 2018 the need for diapers increased as families moved away from aid centers and tried to move back to their looted homes.

As more families move back to Bartella, Qaraqosh, and other towns on the Nineveh Plain they receive less aid than they could have gotten in the larger city of Erbil.

Keep in mind that every Christian home was looted. The washing machines are gone as are the stoves, air conditioners, furniture and even the clothes and dishes.

Because of the images many Americans have of those living in the Middle East, I have to emphasize over and over again that these Christian families were almost all well educated and middle class.

The Christian families did not live in tents or huts, like the image many have set in their minds. Many of these homes were anywhere from 1,500 to 4,000 sq. ft.  and had tiled floors with full modern baths and kitchens. That is all gone, every bit of it.

I have been in these homes … before and after. I have enjoyed dinner in more than one Christian Arab home in the Middle East. I have met Christian men and women who are doctors, lawyers, and businessmen. Some were millionaires before the invasion.

I have also seen the jihadist writings on the walls of destroyed homes. I have visited the shops and even factories that were owned by Christians that now lie empty or in ruins.

There was a huge metal door and window factory at the entrance to Qaraqosh that now lies in ruins. All of the equipment was stolen and carted off to Turkey.

Currently the biggest industry in Iraq is demolition and the reprocessing of scrap metal and cement. Those are not great paying jobs.

And sadly, I must report that most of the wealthy Christians, those that were millionaires fled to Europe during the occupation by the Islamic State. They don’t plan on coming back. Without the wealthy the rebuilding process will be even slower.

Every dollar counts in a situation like this: This is why the Diapers for Refugees program is so important. Every dollar’s worth of diapers we can furnish to families in need is one more dollar they have to rebuild their shattered lives, one more dollar to help buy dishes or linens or a mattress to sleep on.

These are the reasons I want to keep the Diapers for Refugees program alive in 2019.

One Million Diapers in 2018!

The supporters of the Religious Freedom Coalition propelled the Diapers for Refugees project to a record number of Christian families in Iraq and Jordan. In all, over one million diapers were delivered to Christian families in need during 2018.

All of the families helped were in situations where cloth diapers for babies could not be used. All of the families faced economic situations caused by the destruction of there homes in Iraq and Syria by various Islamic jihad fighters, including those from the Islamic State.

While the Islamic State did a great deal of damage and killed tens of thousands, the jihad fighters of other groups including al-Nusra killed and destroyed as well. Al-Nusra is currently known as Jabbat Fetah al-Sham, but the first name it used was al-Qaeda in the Levant.

Yes! This is a branch of the organization that attacked the United States on 9-11. This is the organization founded by Osama bin Laden. It is also the main group fighting to overthrow the secular government of Syria. When the United States armed the “opposition” in Syria, all the funds and missiles wound up in the hands of al-Qaeda.

William Murray in Qaraqosh just after it was liberated in 2016. No civilians had moved back.

Situation no better: I first visited the Christian town of Qaraqosh, Iraq in December 2016 just three months after it was liberated and before one single resident moved back. While I was there I could here the artillery fire from the front lines outside of Mosul, the largest city that the Islamic State occupied.

At the time I led a caravan that took food and water to members of the Christian militia know as the Nineveh Protection Unit. They, along with a Shia Muslim militia, had liberated the town from the hands of the Sunni Muslim jihadists.

I know we are told by our government officials every day that the Sunni Muslims are our allies, but sadly this is a lie. Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State (ISIS) were Sunni Muslim, and both at one time or another have been funded by the Sunni Muslim state of Saudi Arabia.

Every terror attack you can think of against Americans including 9-11 and the attacks at Ft. hood, San Bernardino, Orlando and others were all carried out by Sunni Muslims, and every one of the murderous perpetrators had some connections that led back to Saudi Arabia.

Donate today!

 

Diapers for Refugees: One million more diapers this year!

 

Diapers for Refugees: One million more diapers this year!

Good news: I have sent the $35,000 to Iraq needed to purchase 500,000 diapers for distribution in September.

We distribute six sizes of diapers to displaced Christian families. The small blue package is women’s sanitary pads. Not pictured are adult diapers for special needs individuals.

Bad news: We still need $35,000 for the December distribution at the same time we are preparing for the Christmas for Refugees program expansion.

It will be difficult to raise the $35,000 needed for the diapers at the same time we are raising funds for the Christmas for Refugees program which will be serving refugee children and their families in four, and hopefully five, different nations.
Please help Christian refugee children

We are currently buying 500,000 diapers at a time which greatly reduces the cost.  Each diaper shipment supplies diapers for about 2,000 infants and toddlers over a three-month period.  Since we buy in this quantity, we can buy them direct from the factory in Turkey for just 3.7 cents each.  Over a three-month period, around 300 diapers are distributed per child. The actual number for each child depends upon age. Packages contain from 24 to 44 diapers depending on the age.  

Diapers for Refugees will distribute 888 of these packages of adult diapers in September to those in the most need

The Diapers for Refugees program began in 2016 when I learned of the horrors caused by a lack of clean diapers.  Some babies were scarred for life from extreme diaper rash that became infected.  Cloth diapers could not be washed properly as there was no hot water and so many people were sharing the limited bathroom facilities that there were outbreaks of disease.

As Christian families move back to their looted and burned out homes in the Nineveh Plain, the situation has not improved.  The well water has the same content of salt as sea water and can’t be used to wash cloth diapers.  Drinking and cooking water must be trucked in for perhaps another year, until lines are repaired to bring in fresh water from elsewhere.

Adult diapers are a separate issue.  We are buying 888 packages of special needs adult diapers for distribution in September.  These are very high quality manufactured in Turkey.  There is a great need for these among very elderly Christians who did not receive critical medical care earlier.

Please pray with me that all the funds needed for the Diapers for Refugees program for the rest of the year will be raised well before the beginning of the Christmas season.  There is a critical need.

I do not want to be forced to choose between funding the Diaper program in December or cutting back on the number of children and their families we can help celebrate the Lord’s birth at Christmas for Refugees events.

Many of these Christians have seen loved ones die in horrible, violent ways and at the very least all of them have lost their homes and possessions.  Let’s do what we can to help them! Help Christian Refugee children today

 

 

 

 

 

 

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